Schedule a Consult Today!
521 Park Avenue, New York, NY 10065
Tel 212-223-8300
Steven J. Pearlman, MD, FACS Dual Board Certified in Facial Plastic Surgery

Schedule a Consult Today!

Blog

« Back to Blog

The 10th Annual Vegas Cosmetic Surgery Meeting.

10476127_10152535431224406_8507814462570004110_o

Last week I attended the 10th annual Vegas Cosmetic Surgery meeting where over 1,000 aesthetic physicians were in attendance, along with over 100 presenters. While there, I coordinated the two-day section on rhinoplasty and was scheduled for three talks on revision rhinoplasty, rhinoplasty, and 3-D video imaging. I should note that I am on the advisory committee for the event and that our chairman is Dr. Randy Waldman.

 I am also on the educational group for RealSelf, which was represented at the meeting. I was able to attend the RealSelf physician user group which focused on social media and how physicians can reach out to their patients after procedures and respond to  any questions they may have. Below are a few more photos from the event. 

10420264_10152539239389406_1592221629850112163_n

 

10431362_10152538555399406_2749556748635838563_o

 

 

 

 

Adventures in Amsterdam Part 3.

Friday was the final day of the course, a day devoted to revision rhinoplasty. I gave the featured lecture, titled: “Lessons learned in revision rhinoplasty, how to avoid it in the first place.” This lecture evolved from a study I performed and published reviewing the reasons patients seek revision rhinoplasty. Since over almost half of my rhinoplasty practice is fixing problems, I presented the most common reasons patients seek revision rhinoplasty, what likely went wrong, how I fixed it, and most importantly, how to avoid it in the first place. As in all of medicine, the best treatment for a problem is prevention. 

 

That night we had an elegant dinner with our hosts Drs. Gilbert Nolste-Trenite and Dirk Jan Menger and their wives. Not only was the dinner wonderful, but Gilbert is a wine aficionado, so the wines were spectacular. Friday afternoon, Saturday and Saturday night, Ali and I were on our own to further explore Amsterdam. Included was the newly renovated Riiksmuseum, just recently re-opened after 10 years of renovation. 

 

My wife and friends sometimes ask me why I travel so far and often to lecture. My travel and hotel were covered by the meeting but I’m taking days off from my practice without pay. Academic medicine is about teaching others, giving back and the opportunity to share ideas with other experts from around the world. It’s an immeasurable experience to lecture around the world, an excuse to travel and an unmatched opportunity to share ideas with others. 

Plastic surgery – reconstructs your self-esteem, too.

ultherapy1A rhinoplasty can do more than rebuild your nose – it can build confidence, too.

Looking good is something that everyone wants and there is nothing wrong with that. If a little bit of plastic surgery is going to give you the confidence that you need to take that extra leap, either professionally or socially, then cosmetic plastic surgery is something you shouldn’t feel ashamed to consider.

This is especially true if there is something about your appearance that makes you want to hide or keeps you from exploring new opportunities due to fear and anxiety.

This isn’t only for cosmetic procedures like nosejobs, accident victims also fall into this category and tend to be great candidates for reconstructive  facial plastic surgery.  This may affect your social life, love life, or even your willingness to take professional risks like public speaking or leadership positions.  While your surgeon will recommend that you receive mental health care to deal with any emotional or psychological trauma you suffered during your accident, he will be able to assist you with the physical trauma and scars to help you along as well.

It’s important to note that facial plastic surgery is a major operation, so choose your surgeon wisely.   An unskilled doctor could, instead of raising your self esteem, botch a procedure and leave you worse off than when you started. In fact, many skilled plastic surgeons who are very talented in body plastic surgery procedures do not achieve the same results a facial plastic surgeon can for facial cosmetic surgery procedures as they do not specialize. Also, make sure you ask you friends and family for references and then do a check with the national medical association on your doctor. Ask your doctor to see before and after pictures of other patients they have worked on. This will give you the courage to go ahead with your plastic surgery.

Plastic surgery can take years off of your face & neck. Live like a celebrity, and treat yourself to a more attractive you.

Call for a consultation today: (212) 380-1541

Rhinoplasty and Revision Rhinoplasty Publications

How patients used to find their doctors

Back when I started my training in the ‘80s patients sought out the doctors who taught other doctors. This group included those who published articles in peer reviewed journals, legitimate medical journals that require stringent review of all submissions for content and contributions to medical education. This also included the doctors who routinely gave lectures at medical meetings. These physicians were the leaders in their field as recognized by their peers and subsequently the general public. I was fortunate to have four articles published last year in such journals on rhinoplasty, revision rhinoplasty and Botox treatments, as listed below:

Radix grafts in cosmetic rhinoplasty; lessons learned from an 8 year review. By Justin Cohen MD and Steven Pearlman, MD. Published in Archives of Facial Plastic Surgery, Volume 14 (6), November/December 2012

An Anatomic Basis for Revision Rhinoplasty. By Steven Pearlman, MD and Ben Talei, MD. Published in Facial Plastic Surgery Volume 28(4), August 2012.

Avoiding Complications of the Middle Vault in Rhinoplasty. By Steven Pearlman MD and Roxanna Baratelli, MD. Published in Facial Plastic Surgery Volume 28(3), June 2012.

Physician Confidence in Fillers and Neurotoxins: A National Survey. By Steven Pearlman, MD, Ben Talei, MD, Heidi Waldorf, MD, Michael Kane, MD and Roger Dailey, MD. Published in Archives of Facial Plastic Surgery, Volume 14(1) January-February 2012.

 

Facial Plastic Surgery Journal, Dr. Pearlman Guest editor

Facial Plastic Surgery Journal, Dr. Pearlman Guest editor

This might not look like much, but getting one article published per year is considered an accomplishment. Additionally, I was guest editor for the journal, Facial Plastic Surgery for June 2012. In that Journal, I invited 12 highly respected Facial Plastic Surgeons, Cosmetic Dermatologists and Oculoplastic Surgeons to discuss the most common complications found in various aspects of facial surgery, how and why they occurred and suggestions on how to avoid them in the first place. Dating back to my residency, the monthly Quality Assurance meetings were just that, a review of all complications to be used as a teaching tool on how to improve quality and reduce future complications.

Now we spend time when we are not engaged in patient care writing blogs, posts and website copy to get the “word” out. But, as physicians, we cannot lose sight of the extreme importance of contributing to the medical literature.

Rhinoplasty and Revision Rhinoplasty Publications

Back when I started my training in the ’80s, patients sought out the doctors who taught other doctors. This group included those who published articles in peer reviewed journals — legitimate medical journals that require stringent review of all submissions for content and contributions to medical education. This also included the doctors who routinely gave lectures at medical meetings. These physicians were the leaders in their field as recognized by their peers and subsequently the general public. I was fortunate to have four articles published this past year in such journals on rhinoplasty, revision rhinoplasty and Botox treatments, as listed at the end of this article.*

This might not look like much, but getting one article published per year is considered an accomplishment. Additionally, I was guest editor for the journal, Facial Plastic Surgery, for June 2012. In that journal, I invited 12 highly respected Facial Plastic Surgeons, Cosmetic Dermatologists and Oculoplastic Surgeons to discuss:

  • the most common complications found in various aspects of facial surgery,
  • how and why they occurred, and
  • suggestions on how to avoid them in the first place.

Dating back to my residency, the monthly Quality Assurance meetings were just that, a review of all complications to be used as a teaching tool on how to improve quality and reduce future complications.
Now we spend time when we are not engaged in patient care writing blogs, posts and website copy to get the “word” out. But we cannot lose sight of the extreme importance of contributing to the medical literature.

*Radix grafts in cosmetic rhinoplasty; lessons learned from an 8 year review. By Justin Cohen MD and Steven Pearlman, MD. Published in Archives of Facial Plastic Surgery, Volume 14 (6), November/December 2012

An Anatomic Basis for Revision Rhinoplasty. By Steven Pearlman, MD and Ben Talei, MD. Published in Facial Plastic Surgery Volume 28(4), August 2012.

Avoiding Complications of the Middle Vault in Rhinoplasty. By Steven Pearlman MD and Roxanna Baratelli, MD. Published in Facial Plastic Surgery Volume 28(3), June 2012.

Physician Confidence in Fillers and Neurotoxins: A National Survey. By Steven Pearlman, MD, Ben Talei, MD, Heidi Waldorf, MD, Michael Kane, MD and Roger Dailey, MD. Published in Archives of Facial Plastic Surgery, Volume 14(1) January-February 2012.

Considering a Nose Job? Ask yourself these 5 key questions

Rhinoplasty, better known as a “nose job”, is performed to alter the size and/or shape of the nose and is one of the most commonly performed types of plastic surgery. An estimated 77,000 people got rhinoplasty in 2010; while some simply didn’t like the noses they were born with, others needed corrections to previous surgeries or accidents that damaged their noses.

Before opting for any kind of cosmetic surgery, there are some key questions you should ask yourself before going under the knife.

Am I healthy enough to get plastic surgery?

Cosmetic surgery has its risks just like any other type of surgical procedure. The risks are even greater in people who have preexisting health conditions. That is why it is wise to take your health into consideration before getting any type of cosmetic procedure. Your plastic surgeon may require that you receive clearance from your physician.

Have I considered the alternatives?

There are a number of ways you can improve their appearance without getting rhinoplasty. Trying a new hairstyle or wearing makeup are two of the many ways to improve your looks without going under the knife. Makeup tricks can also change how your nose appears, and some cosmetic injectable fillers can alter the appearance of your nose temporarily without invasive surgery.

Am I doing this for myself or to please others?

Far too many women get cosmetic surgery to conform to society’s standard of beauty or to impress someone else. While a nose job, or any cosmetic surgery, can improve your appearance and life, it’s important to do it for the right reasons. Do it for yourself, not someone else.

Can I afford this procedure?

Nose jobs can cost thousands of dollars, depending on the surgeon and the complexity of the procedure. Because most nose jobs are elective, they aren’t covered by insurance. While you may be able to setup a payment plan with your surgeon’s office, you may be expected to pay a significant amount up front. Note that many med spas and clinics accept credit cards, so that’s always an option as well.

Can I afford to take time out of work and school?

In the end, it’s worth it, but in the meantime, you will be sore after your nose job. Patients are expected to stay home for at least a week after surgery and are advised to avoid strenuous activity. Make sure you can afford to miss work or school during this time period and that you have help with daily tasks, such as child care and household chores.

Once all the above answers are “yes” make sure you choose a doctor who specializes in rhinoplasty. Ask your doctor of choice, how many they perform per year, look at their before and after photos and consider computer imaging to make sure you are both on the same page.

 

Copyright 2012. As licensed to Pearlman Aesthetic Surgery. All rights reserved

Back To Top